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George Sloan ’04 wrote today’s episode of “How I Met Your Mother,” set to air at 8 p.m. ET on CBS. It is the third episode of the hit sitcom that Sloan has written. In addition, several Quinnipiac alumni will appear in the episode.

Click here to preview the episode

 

sang-namAccording to Facebook’s new policy, now users can post gruesome videos as long as users do not celebrate the action or they can post gruesome videos to condemn the action.

Sang Nam, associate professor of communications in the department of film, video and interactive media in the School of Communications at Quinnipiac University, is available to comment.

“”I’m deeply concerned about our youth who will be exposed to these videos. These gruesome videos online, especially on Facebook, are just a click away from our teens. It only takes few seconds to view such graphical videos, but the psychological damage might be permanent. These videos are harsh to adults, and it can leave a permanent trauma on our youth,” said Nam.

“Facebook’s decision seems to be based on its belief that responsible users can decide what to watch and what not to watch and Facebook doesn’t intervene on people’s freedom of speech and people’s right to have access to information online. However, these gruesome videos are just a click away, and one click can hurt our youth, who might be too young to fully understand the consequences of online actions.

“Some might say the Internet has a self-correcting mechanism and gruesome videos would be removed by concerned users. It is true in a sense, but Facebook is risking many vulnerable teens by lifting its ban on gruesome videos. A self-correcting mechanism still takes time and effort to put aside these graphical materials. Facebook might not want to be seen as a company that strips someone’s freedom of speech and intervenes or controls users’ access to information online, but it is wrong and irresponsible for Facebook to lift its ban on gruesome videos without creating a proper warning. Again, with one click, our teens could be exposed to these videos, and it can leave a permanent damage in their mind.

“It’s ironic that Facebook still bans the children breast-feeding images due to exposed woman’s breasts, but you can watch the videos of decapitations on Facebook. Which leaves more damages in youth’s mind? I think we all know, except Facebook.”

To speak to Nam, please call John Morgan, associate vice president for public relations at Quinnipiac, at 203-206-4449 (cell) or 203-582-5359 (office).

Molly Yanity, assistant professor of journalism in the School of Communications, is available to discuss NFL running back Adrian Peterson’s decision to play two days after his two-year-old son died in an alleged case of child abuse.

“The greatest thing that can come from the tragic death of Adrian Peterson’s young son is that a light will be shined on the violence that is afflicted upon this nation’s children every day,” said Yanity. “It is not, however, the story of a great athlete performing under the emotional duress of needlessly losing a child.”

“I wish it was, and the media — of which I was once a willing and excited member — will have you believe that. This is part of the ‘good man’ narrative that, at the turn of the 20th century, gave us biographies of the great, white athletes like Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb and Mickey Mantle — without the sexism, racism and alcoholism that plagued these humans. This is the problem we are faced with when we hear of these narratives. We want to believe Peterson, a back of such unique skill, is also a great man. He may be. In this case, I sympathize with him, his family and, more so, the family of the woman he impregnated. I would rather read about the truth of this matter — a single mother whose boyfriend beat and murdered her child —  than about a privileged athlete who may have ignored a responsibility.”

Molly Yanity teaches, among other things, sports-media-culture and reporting for the Web. She covered sports for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer from 2001-2009, was a regular on sports talk radio in Seattle and Spokane, and received her PhD in mass communication from Ohio University in 2013. She has also been published in the International Journal of Sport Communication and the Chronicle of Higher Education.

To schedule an interview with Yanity, please call John Morgan, associate vice president for public relations, at 203-206-4449.

HanleyRich Hanley, associate professor and director of the graduate journalism program in the School of Communications at Quinnipiac University, was quoted in an E-Commerce Times article on Apple’s reaction to the uprising of the phablet, the combination of a smartphone and a tablet.

“Apple may move into the phablet space if only to neutralize Samsung as much as it can in the growing Asian market for the latest fad in mobile devices,” said Hanley

Apple is too much of a fanatic of high-quality design to settle, he said.

“In the final analysis, the company’s fidelity to design aesthetics suggests it will not transform the iPhone into the clumsy is-it-a-fish-or-fowl form factor of the phablet,” he said. “Apple’s form simply does not follow the phablet’s awkward function.”

Please click here to read the full article which also appeared in MacNewsWorld

The state of Connecticut is taking action to preserve professional tennis in New Haven amid speculation in recent months that New Haven Open tournament might move. An announcement on the future of the tennis tournament has been scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 10.

Rich Hanley, associate professor of journalism and director of the graduate journalism program at Quinnipiac University, is available to comment.

“The state is moving to protect its investment in the tennis center where the tournament takes place,” said Hanley. “Without the tournament, the facility would have no purpose despite millions of tax dollars spent to build it and later to refurbish it. There is also a sense typical of states and municipalities that pro sports are necessary to present a big-league image to make the place attractive to business. That’s why the state is interested in keeping the pro tennis tournament in New Haven and the pro golf tournament in Cromwell.”

Molly Yanity, assistant professor of journalism at Quinnipiac, is also available to comment.

“Without a major professional team in immediate proximity, the state should be particularly interested in keeping this event in New Haven,” said Yanity.

“There is some buzz about women’s tennis, particularly with the Williams sisters still going strong, and there is a marketing demographic here to tap. When considering tennis, the marketing demographic is everything. At the US Open, for example, the main sponsors aren’t Bud Light and Taco Bell, like you see with the NFL. Rather, the sponsors are higher-end corporations like Citizen watches, big banks, Mercedes, Heineken and Ralph Lauren. Given the market demographics of Connecticut, this partnership between the state and the ATP makes sense. The big local sponsors have been Yale, the Yale-New Haven Hospital and First Niagara. With a target audience that is highly educated and has some expendable income, this sponsorship opportunity makes some sense – and it gives the state some professional sporting culture.”

Molly Yanity teaches, among other things, sports-media-culture and reporting for the Web. She covered sports for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer from 2001-2009, was a regular on sports talk radio in Seattle and Spokane, and received her PhD in mass communication from Ohio University in 2013. She has also been published in the International Journal of Sport Communication and the Chronicle of Higher Education.

To speak to Hanley or Yanity, please call John Morgan, associate vice president for public relations at Quinnipiac, at 203-206-4449 (cell).

Fabio LoNero (Broadcast Journalism, 2006) was just three days away from tackling his newest promotion at WTNH-TV in New Haven, Conn.  But he was willing to share his excitement and trepidations with students in the Art of Journalistic Interviewing class Oct. 1, 2013.

(left to right): Micah Bailey, Nya Thompson, Abby Uzamere, Fabio LoNero, Taylor Popielarz, Stephanie Alwardt, Sarah Faidell  (in rear): Dan Burdick

(left to right): Micah Bailey, Nya Thompson, Abby Uzamere, Fabio LoNero, Taylor Popielarz, Stephanie Alwardt, Sarah Faidell (in rear): Dan Burdick

LoNero was promoted from the producer of the 5 p.m. Monday-Friday newscasts to Executive Producer of Good Morning Connecticut, the daily three-hour newscast.  This will mean LoNero has to make the 40-minute drive from his Newington home early enough to reach the New Haven studio by 2:30 a.m.But he’s not complaining.  Although the goal of the morning newscasts is to provide viewers with what’s new, now and next, he said he hopes to air stories that will “give real value for people to watch.”  He said this is part of the philosophy behind the station’s “We’ve Got Your Back” slogan.

LoNero told students that beginners in TV news have to be willing to sacrifice, which in his case was working the overnight shift when he started at WTNH-TV seven years ago.  It meant missing out on weekend fun because he had to be in by 1 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.  But he has no regrets and he said he is happy he stayed at the same station since graduation.  “They invested in me, training me, moving me up so I didn’t necessarily feel like I needed to leave there,” LoNero said.

Getting the job straight out of school involved a bit of luck.  LoNero said he ran into a WTNH-TV employee taking a graduate course at Quinnipiac and because she remembered Fabio from his internship, she advised him to apply for a job that had just become available.

“When you go to an internship, treat it like a job.  If you want to learn something, make sure you speak up.  Don’t just sit there stay quiet, “ he said.  “During times when it’s slow, go up to people at say ‘hey, can you teach me this?’ or ask the internship coordinator ‘when can I get to do this?’”

His advice was to do more than fill out the weekly internship report for school.  “I knew that I wanted to work in this business one day,” he said.  Because there are only four TV stations in Connecticut and he wanted to stay near his family, he realized the number of jobs was scarce and connections would be critical.  His advice is to be memorable.  “Memorable is the key word here because if management remembers you and they liked you, you have a shot at getting one of those part-time A.P. (assistant producer) positions,” he said.

Turnover is so frequent in TV newsrooms so LoNero said his first part-time job turned into a full-time job after only six months, reminding students “that could be you.”

Like many broadcast journalism students, LoNero wanted to be a reporter and anchor.  But his experience at Q30 convinced him that his talent was really producing newscasts.  “At the end of the day, when I’m in the control room, what I’m putting out is something I spent seven-and-a-half hours putting together all day.  That’s the rewarding part.  I get to say what it’s going to look like,” he said.

LoNero also credits Q30 for honing his writing skills.  “Basically at Q30 it was all about the writing.  In this business, in TV, it’s more crucial because you have one shot to get your message out,” he said.  “So you have one shot to be very clear and concise about what you want to say, so writing is important.  Q30 helped with the writing. If you want to be marketable, if you want to be good, writing is important,” LoNero advised.

“If you want to be in TV, focus on the writing.  It doesn’t matter if you want to be in front of the camera or behind the camera,” he added.  “Writing is the key.  That’s the one thing that makes TV news what it is.  It’s the writing,” he said.


Tony Shepherd, manager of broadcast marketing for Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, encouraged students to reach clients through aspirational marketing. (Photo by Anna Brundage ’13, MS ’15.)

Tony Shepherd, manager of broadcast marketing for Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, encouraged Quinnipiac University students across disciplines to tug at potential customers’ emotions during a presentation and meet-and-greet on Sept. 20.

“The marketing strategy is about finding the emotional and aspirational aspect,” said Shepherd. “We create the urgency to want to come. Bring your kids to Disney while it’s still magical.”

The event was sponsored by the School of Business and School of Communications at Quinnipiac University and The Walt Disney Company.

The presentation capped off a day of conversations with students in and outside of classes.

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